Research

Research – Rangahau

“Continuing ancient traditions of healing by soothing hearts, minds, souls and bodies”

While much research on Indigenous people predmoninates Indigenous loss, lack, and deficit, my work uniquely explicates and elevates ceaseless trans-generational Indigenous vitalities. These are visible as the local, national and global wave of re-emerging Indigenous identities and institutions.

All peoples arise from vital Indigenous origins. Our capacity to maintain this awareness and the life-values it endows varies according to our experiences and ‘his-stories’ or narratives of colonisation and enforced ‘modernisation’, realtive to our peoples capacity to sustain and hold to our vital original life-system values, realties, memories, identities and institutions.

HineKorako

I have a particular interest in exploring the re-emergence of Indigenous life-systems of balance, healing, and wholeness. These are timeless yet also timely (in terms of the mental, social and ecological crisis we face today), wellbeing systems that restore and maintain balance, healing, and wholeness individually, collectively, and inter-relationally in what may be termed ‘holistic public health human and natural wellbeing systems’.

IMG_1587

Consistent with the global Indigenous experience of colonisation and invasion, my people have a significant mental illness history. Many of us are trapped in mentally, chemically, psychically, traumatically, and spiritually induced prisons. Some of us exist in worlds not only distant to the everyday of most, we are far distant from worlds that can mirror our own, and therefore our ancestral vital selves and potentials.

At the same time there is a globally occurring revitalisation of Indigneneity as part of a wider phenomenon or ‘calling’ of many people for restoration to Original identities and life-ways. I seek to bring these two fields – the existing health systems, particularly mental health – together with the knowledge, practices and life-ways that are the phenomenon of re-emerging Indigenous vitalities, identities and institutions. I seek to also bring the light and realities of these Original/Indigenous vitalities to bear on, and critically examine, the existing and dominant conceptualisations, practices and systems of health and mental health.

I have a particular interest in the chronic state of mental unwellness that currently grips, not just Indigenous peoples, but an expanding majority of ‘modern’ humanities mind/s, thereby alienating us from our individual and collective identities and potentials.

images-19

My PhD work critically examines the convergence between the expanding wave of re-emerging Indigenous identities, values and realties at four levels, local, institutional, global and international. Indigenous revitalisation is explicated locally as Māori, globally as Indigenous, and internationally as an amassing movement of dis-aggregated ‘modern’ peoples, not usually recognised as Indigenous, but who nonetheless are waking up and finding their way back to original Indigenous values and ways of collectively re-membering, talking, thinking and responding.

images-4

To assist the re-emergence of identities, institutional forms, knowledge and practices that prioritise the holistic health and wellbeing of the entire human and natural worlds, I am particularly interested in promoting relationships and synergistic alignments between vital Indigenous systems of wisdom, knowledge and practices, and Western systems of knowledge and practices.

Background

While attending my first genuine Māori wānanga in 2003 I was struck by an ‘ancestor epiphany’ calling me to do all I could to restore the brilliance and mana of my tipuna (ancestors) while here between Papatūanuku (Earth-mother) and Ranginui (Sky-Father). Within two years I left iwi (tribally) based social-work to commence full-time study.

Today, I hold a degree and Masterate in Psychology, am a qualified Mauri Ora Kaiwhakaruruhau, and am currently completing a PhD Psychology with Massey University Palmerston North. I attend iwi (tribal) and hapu (sub-tribe) wānanga (original learning institutions) and continue to learn te reo me ona tikanga (Māori language and traditions), and possess some fluency and qualifications in these areas.

In terms of hands on experience, I am a Mother (4) and Nana (5), and have been a practitioner of traditional Māori healing and Wholistic Māori Psychologies for over thirteen years. Previously, I have practiced professionally as a social worker, facilitator, intensive therapeutic practitioner, for Non-Government agencies, and providers, and advocated for our Kura Kaupapa Māori (total immersion Māori school), and Kohanga Reo (total immersion Māori traditional early language nest). I am an active member of our whānau, hapu, and iwi.

Contact Waireti

Publications

Roestenburg, M.(2010). Ahakoa He Kiri Ma: A Fire in Our Blood. (Masters dissertation, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand). Retrieved from http://mro.massey.ac.nz

Conference Presentations

Roestenburg, M. (2009). Progress, or progressive human cultural destruction? Paper presented at the15th International Critical and Feminist Perspectives in Health and Social Justice Conference, Auckland, New Zealand.

Roestenburg, M. (2009, August). Ahakoa he kiri ma: A fire in our blood. Student Presentation at the 2009 New Zealand Psychological Society Annual Conference – Conflict…Process…Resolution. Pāpa…Mahi…Ratanga. Palmerston North Conference, Palmerston North, New Zealand.

Roestenburg, M. (2010). Ahakoa he kiri ma: A fire in our blood. Presented at the 4th International Traditional Knowledge Conference 2010: Kei muri i te kāpara he tangata ke: Recognising, understanding, engaging. Waipapa Marae, Auckland University, Auckland, New Zealand.

Roestenburg, M. (2010, October). Ahakoa he kiri ma: A fire in our blood. Paper presented at the MAI Maori Doctoral Conference. Te Herenga Waka Marae. Victoria University, Wellington. New Zealand.

Roestenburg, M. (2012). Te turangawaewae o te whakaohooho mauri: The conceptual home-place of the re-awakening Indigenous spirit. Presented at the Doing Psychology: Manawatū Doctoral Research. School of Psychology, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.

Roestenburg, M. (2013, November). Te Tī: Māori and Indigenous resilience. Paper presented at the MAI Maori Doctoral Conference. Waipapa Marae. Auckland University, Auckland. New Zealand.

Roestenburg, M. (2015, June). Whakaohooho mauri:The re-awakening Indigenous Spirit. Presented at Tūramarama Ki Te Ora:National Suicide Prevention Conference. Tāngatarua Marae and Holiday Hotel Rotorua, New Zealand.

Published proceedings

Roestenburg, M. (2012). Te turangawaewae o te whakaohooho mauri: The conceptual home-place of the re-awakening Indigenous spirit. In (ed.), Refereed Proceedings of Doing Psychology: Manawatū Doctoral Research Symposium, 2, x-y. Retrieved from http://mro.massey.ac.nz/10179/2645. School of Psychology, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.

Roestenburg, M. (2010). Ahakoa he kiri ma: A fire in our blood. In J. Te Rito & S. Healy (Eds.), Proceedings of the 4th International Traditional Knowledge Conference 2010: Kei muri i te kāpara he tangata ke: Recognising, understanding, engaging difference (pp. 307-317). Auckland, New Zealand: PRINTSTOP+.

Roestenburg, M. (2009). Progress, or progressive human cultural destruction? Paper presented at the15th International Critical and Feminist Perspectives in Health and Social Justice Conference, Auckland, New Zealand.

Unpublished

Roestenburg, M. (2009). Ahakoa He Kiri Ma: A Fire in Our Blood Pilot. (Unpublished dissertation pilot). Ngā Pae o Te Māramatanga Summer Internship, Whanganui, New Zealand.